Training Programs

Please visit the "My Health, My Choice, My Life Website" for more details and important information on this program, located at http://myhealthmychoicemylife.org

 Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a peer-led health and self-management program that assists individuals in gaining and developing the knowledge, skills, and motivation they need to manage the day-to-day realities of their physical and mental health symptoms.  It is based on the principle that confident, knowledgeable individuals practicing self-management will be empowered to live a life of purpose and well-being.

The evidence-based CDSMP was developed by Stanford University’s Patient Education Center.  Regional Peer Wellness Coaches co-facilitate the workshop with Peer Leaders.  Each workshop consists of 2.5 hour classes per week over a six week period. 

The CDSMP focuses on problems common to individuals suffering from chronic diseases.  Coping strategies such as action planning and feedback, behavior modeling, problem-solving techniques, and decision making are applicable to all chronic diseases.  The following topics are covered:

Developing and maintaining a long-term exercise program

  • Fatigue management
  • Dealing with anger, depression, and other negative emotions
  • Cognitive management of pain and stress
  • Communication with family/friends/physicians
  • Using prescribed medication appropriately
  • Healthy eating
  • Making informed treatment decisions
  • Advance directives and Declaration for Mental Health Treatment
  • Developing decision-making and problem-solving skills

Diabetes Self-Management Program

The Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP) is a peer-led and self-management program that assists individuals in gaining and developing the knowledge, skills, and motivation they need to manage the day-to-day realities of their diabetes.  It is based on the principle that confident, knowledgeable individuals practicing self-management will be empowered to live a life of purpose and well-being.

 

The evidence-based DSMP was developed by Stanford University’s Patient Education Center.  Regional Peer Wellness Coaches co-facilitate the workshop with Peer Leaders.  Each workshop consists of 2.5 hour classes per week over a six week period.

 

The DSMP focuses on emphasizing ways to help participants increase their confidence and self-efficacy they have managing their diabetes and the problems that occur because of it.   Action planning and feedback, behavior modeling, problem-solving techniques, and brainstorming are some of the strategies used to build confidence and encourage participation.  The following topics are covered:

                                    -Healthy eating and meal planning

                                    -Monitoring blood sugar levels

                                    -Preventing low blood sugar

                                    -Preventing and delaying complications from diabetes                                                                    

                                    -Guidelines for safely exercising and maintaining balance of blood sugar

                                    -Reading nutrition labels

                                    -Foot care

                                    -Dealing with anger, depression, and other negative emotions

                                    -Communication with family/friends/physicians                                                                               

                                    -Strategies for sick days

 The Eight Dimensions of Wellness* 

People in recovery from mental illness or both mental illness and substance use pick and choose from a wide array of possible tools to use in their recovery. But everyone must take care of their own health and wellness or suffer the consequences. And the consequences are a matter of life and death.

In 2006, the National Association of State Mental Health Directors released a research study that revealed people who have mental illness are dying, on average, 25 years younger than the rest of the population. And they are not dying from mental illness. People who have mental illness are dying from treatable conditions that are caused by smoking, obesity, substance abuse, and inadequate access to medical care. They are dying from diabetes, heart disease, respiratory diseases, and infectious diseases. People who have mental illness, therefore, must pay attention to their own health and wellness, perhaps even more so than the rest of the population.

Click Here For the Above Wellness Chart 

 There are many ways to take care of yourself and improve your overall wellness. The Eight Dimensions of Wellness offer a starting point for you to consider.

The Eight Dimensions of Wellness*

    Social - developing a sense of connection and a well-developed support system

    Physical - recognizing the need for physical activity, diet, sleep, and nutrition while discouraging the use of tobacco, drugs, and excessive alcohol consumption

    Emotional - developing skills and strategies to cope effectively with stress, challenges, and conflict

    Spiritual - searching for meaning and purpose in human existence

    Occupational - deriving personal satisfaction and enrichment from one's work

    Intellectual - recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills

    Financial - feeling satisfied with current and foreseeablefuture financial situation
*Swarbrick, M. (2006). A wellness approach. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 29(4), 311- 331.

To download a free copy of Margaret (Peggy) Swarbicks booklet entitled  "Wellness In Eight Dimensions" click here. Also see her article "Defining Wellness" by clicking here.

 

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